Fuinneamh, Review

‘Candour and Humour’ High Hopes by Steve Garrigan Review

In his deeply personal memoir, named after the band’s famous song, Kodaline frontman Steve Garrigan’s shares a different side of him – one that is away from the spotlight. On the very first page of his book, he admits he never thought he would have the courage to write a book about his life – but it turned out to …


Analysis, Arts & Culture, Fuinneamh, Opinion

Has the Pandemic Changed the Arts Scene Forever?

It has been a long and exhausting year and a half. On a personal level, even if you’ve had the luck not to lose anyone to the virus, or contract it yourself, spending so long under a Groundhog Day of isolation would drive anyone’s mental health into the mud. Even on a grander more sociological scale, we’ve been faced with …


Thrills, Jealously and Unravelling Dream Sequences: Last Night in Soho Review

Moving to the big city is meant to be a nerve-racking but thrilling experience. Unfortunately for fashion student Eloise, she might not be ready for quite the amount of frights and thrills in store in this horror thriller from the mind behind the Cornetto trilogy, Edgar Wright. Thomasin Mackenzie plays Eloise, a talented young designer from Cornwall who gets accepted …

Does the Media Romanticise Toxic Relationships?

For years now we have been dependent on the media for entertainment and information as we are constantly bombarded with media and news from around the globe. It is through what we watch that we form an opinion, and it is no surprise we do so with our relationships as well. Childhood friends turned to lovers, possessive and dominating partners …

The Art of Preserving Irish with Manchán Magan

What can certain words of the Irish language tell us about our culture? For writer Manchán Magan, answering this question has spurred his latest book ‘Tree Dogs, Banshee Fingers and other Irish Words for Nature.’ Reuniting with publishing house Gill and illustrator Steve Doogan, it serves as a sequel to his bestselling ‘Thirty Two Words for Field.’ The idea originated …

Thirteen Films of Halloween: Friday the 13th

Going by other film franchises in the same genre, one would assume that the first film in a series with as many movies as Friday the 13th (12 to be exact) would turn out to be the best. John Carpenter did it with ‘Halloween’, Wes Craven with ‘A Nightmare on Elm Street’ and Tobe Hooper with ‘The Texas Chainsaw Massacre’. …

Thirteen Films of Halloween: Scream

The overall legacy of Wes Craven’s major hit ‘Scream’ can be summed up like this, without its existence, the horror genre or put it, the slasher genre would be dead and buried with its many hulking killers fading away into direct-to-video mediocrity. Fans can thank screenwriter Kevin Williamson, along with director Wes Craven for rejuvenating the genre to the masses, …

Thirteen Films of Halloween:Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter (1984)

The Friday the 13th series is a funny one for me, not only is it thrashy by nature with it’s B-movie feel and questionable acting, but it can also be a lot of fun. With the fourth instalment ‘Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter’, it has everything one would expect from a Friday movie. It has sex, nudity, …